July 28, 2016

Digital Health Age Day 4: Prince Harry throws light on mental health challenges

Throughout this week Inhealthcare is to be guest editor of Digital Health Age.

It will include articles about Inhealthcare’s mission to save the NHS, why digital health makes sense for both patients and the public purse and an interview with a senior figure from the healthcare establishment.

As seen in Digital Health Age day 4

As a member of the Royal Family, Prince Harry knows that his actions will attract a lot of attention. So when he hosted a summer barbecue party for the charity Heads Together this week he ensured that the subject of mental health would be brought to centre stage.

The prince said he regretted not talking about the death of his mother Princess Diana sooner, highlighting the difficulties that many people face in dealing with grief. He told the BBC: “Anyone can suffer… whether they are a member of the Royal Family, a sports star, a soldier… or a white van driver.”

One in four adults suffer a mental health problem during their lifetime and the illness is estimated to cost the UK economy £1bn a year. Digital health specialist Inhealthcare is developing new technology to bring some respite to people suffering from low-level depression and anxiety.

The new service, which is set to launch later this autumn, will teach people with these conditions how to use simple self-help strategies to manage problems and improve resilience.

Inhealthcare is working in partnership with not-for-profit company My Possible Self and a globally renowned academic institute to create the iPhone app. My Possible Self, founded by Joanne Wilkinson in 2009, has provided emotional mental health and wellbeing services to thousands of patients. The new service will be tailored to individual needs and will recommend self-help strategies.

Users will be able to choose from 14 different modules ranging from managing loss and major life changes to tackling stress, fear and unhelpful feelings.

The modules are based on proven forms of treatment including cognitive behavioural therapy. The globally renowned academic institute has demonstrated the modules’ success in digital form.

Fleur Wilkinson, product specialist, said: “We want to help everyone reach their best possible self by learning to manage issues that trouble them and enabling them to take back control of their lives. Digital is the most convenient way of doing this. People can access help whenever they need it at whatever time of day or night. Our technology will allow the user to be the most powerful person in their journey.”

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